March Constellations

For northern hemisphere viewers there are a number of constellations available throughout the night. The last of the winter constellations have limited visibility after sunset and most summer constellations will appear in the sky by sunrise.

All constellations visible in March have been grouped into 4 timings so that you can find those relevant to you.

The constellations that pass directly overhead are in the sky for around 12 hours but those in the southern sky will have a shorter path and those in the northern sky a longer path with some constellations visible all the time such as Ursa Minor.

As the earth moves in its orbit around the sun, each night you are looking at a different portion of the sky. When looking at stars it is important to be aware of what is within your view. Northern hemisphere stargazers can group constellations into 3 groups; circumpolar, summer and winter constellations. The circumpolar constellations are in the north sky, appear to move around the north star and are visible throughout the year. The constellations in the south sky are only visible for part of the year and are grouped as either summer or winter constellations. Each is visible from between 4 to 10 months.

It is important to be aware of the specific time of year and hour of the night when deciding what to look for. These pages below show the constellations in each group so you can find the constellations that interest you. 

CIRCUMPOLAR (year around) – Ursa MajorCassiopeiaUrsa Minor – Draco – Cepheus
WINTER – Pegasus – Pisces – Aries – AurigaTaurusOrionCanis Major  – Canis MinorGemini – Lynx – CancerLeoWinter Hexagon
SUMMER – Virgo – Libra – Scorpius – Bootes – Hercules – Lyra – Ophiuchus – Sagittarius – Aquila – Cygnus – Capricornus – Aquarius

Or use this guide to easily see when you can find each constellation:

BEST CONSTELLATIONS TO FIND EACH MONTH
Star sky

What constellations can you find in March during early evening?

Early evening viewers before 21:00

March has some easy constellations to find for early evening viewers in the northern hemisphere. Start in the western sky where some of the best known winter constellations including Cassiopeia and Orion will only be visible for a short time after sunset.

Importantly consider your viewing time and move to the appropriate range of constellations to see.

Western Sky (season ending)

Cassiopeia

Visit the Cassiopeia page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible until 21:00 appearing 30 degrees above the north west horizon at sunset and becoming only partially visible from 21:00.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Hard – Locating asterism: Big Dipper

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 20 south – passes in the northern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during early evening: November to December.

Orion & Orion’s Belt

Visit the Orion page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible until 23:00 appearing 50 degrees above the southern horizon at sunset and becoming only partially visible from 23:00 in the south western sky.

Difficulty to find: Very Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Easy – Locating asterism: Orion’s Belt

Possible to be seen between latitude 60 north and 90 south – passes in the southern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during early evening: January to February.

Middle of sky (north, south and overhead)

Canis Major

Visit the Canis Major page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible until 23:30 appearing 40 degrees above the southern horizon at sunset, reaching its peak at 19:00 and becoming only partially visible from 23:30 in the south western sky.

Difficulty to find: Very Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Easy – Locating asterism: Orion’s Belt

Possible to be seen between latitude 60 north and 90 south – passes in the southern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during early evening: March.

Ursa Major & The Big Dipper

Visit the Ursa Major page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible throughout the night appearing 30 degrees above the south east horizon at sunset, reaching its peak at 24:00 and disappearing 35 degrees above the south west horizon.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Medium – Locating asterism: Big Dipper

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 20 south – passes in the northern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during early evening: April to June.

Ursa Minor & The north star

Visit the Ursa Minor page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible throughout the night remaining in the north sky equal to the distance above the horizon to the latitude of your viewing position.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Medium – Locating asterism: Big Dipper or Cassiopeia

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 0 south – static in the northern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during early evening: All year.

Eastern Sky (season starting)

Leo & The Sickle

Visit the Leo page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible until 03:30 appearing 30 degrees above the eastern horizon at sunset, reaching its peak at 22:00 and becoming only partially visible from 03:30 in the south western sky.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Easy – Locating asterism: Big Dipper or Sickle

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 60 south – passes in the southern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during early evening: April.

March constellations

What constellations can you find in March during mid-evening?

Mid evening viewers from 21:00 to 23:30

March has some easy constellations to find for mid evening viewers in the northern hemisphere.

Importantly consider your viewing time and move to the appropriate range of constellations to see.

Western Sky (season ending)

Canis Major

Visit the Canis Major page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible until 23:30 appearing 40 degrees above the southern horizon at sunset, reaching its peak at 19:00 and becoming only partially visible from 23:30 in the south western sky.

Difficulty to find: Very Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Easy – Locating asterism: Orion’s Belt

Possible to be seen between latitude 60 north and 90 south – passes in the southern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during mid evening: February.

Middle of sky (north, south and overhead)

Leo & The Sickle

Visit the Leo page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible until 03:30 appearing 30 degrees above the eastern horizon at sunset, reaching its peak at 22:00 and becoming only partially visible from 03:30 in the south western sky.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Easy – Locating asterism: Big Dipper or Sickle

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 60 south – passes in the southern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during mid evening: March.

Ursa Major & The Big Dipper

Visit the Ursa Major page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible throughout the night appearing 30 degrees above the south east horizon at sunset, reaching its peak at 24:00 and disappearing 35 degrees above the south west horizon.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Medium – Locating asterism: Big Dipper

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 20 south – passes in the northern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during mid evening: March to May.

Ursa Minor & The north star

Visit the Ursa Minor page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible throughout the night remaining in the north sky equal to the distance above the horizon to the latitude of your viewing position.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Medium – Locating asterism: Big Dipper or Cassiopeia

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 0 south – static in the northern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during id evening: All year.

Eastern Sky (season starting)

Bootes & The Spring Triangle

Visit the Bootes page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible from 20:00 appearing on the eastern horizon at 20:00, reaching its peak at 02:30 and disappearing 50 degrees above the western horizon at sunrise.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Very hard – Locating asterism: Big Dipper

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 50 south – passes overhead for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during mid evening: May.

Bedouins enjoying the star sky

What constellations can you find in March during late evening?

Late evening viewers after 23:30

March has some easy constellations to find for late evening viewers in the northern hemisphere.

Importantly consider your viewing time and move to the appropriate range of constellations to see.

Western Sky (season ending)

Leo & The Sickle

Visit the Leo page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible until 03:30 appearing 30 degrees above the eastern horizon at sunset, reaching its peak at 22:00 and becoming only partially visible from 03:30 in the south western sky.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Easy – Locating asterism: Big Dipper or Sickle

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 60 south – passes in the southern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during late evening: February.

Middle of sky (north, south and overhead)

Ursa Major & The Big Dipper

Visit the Ursa Major page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible throughout the night appearing 30 degrees above the south east horizon at sunset, reaching its peak at 24:00 and disappearing 35 degrees above the south west horizon.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Medium – Locating asterism: Big Dipper

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 20 south – passes in the northern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during late evening: January to April.

Ursa Minor & The north star

Visit the Ursa Minor page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible throughout the night remaining in the north sky equal to the distance above the horizon to the latitude of your viewing position.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Medium – Locating asterism: Big Dipper or Cassiopeia

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 0 south – static in the northern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during late evening: All year.

Bootes & The Spring Triangle

Visit the Bootes page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible from 20:00 appearing on the eastern horizon at 20:00, reaching its peak at 02:30 and disappearing 50 degrees above the western horizon at sunrise.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Very hard – Locating asterism: Big Dipper

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 50 south – passes overhead for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during late evening: April.

Eastern Sky (season starting)

To be added

silhouette of tourists enjoying stars in Wadi Rum on warm desert night

Which constellations can you find in March during early morning?

Early morning viewers

March has some easy constellations to find for early morning viewers in the northern hemisphere.

Importantly consider your viewing time and move to the appropriate range of constellations to see.

Western Sky (season ending)

Bootes & The Spring Triangle

Visit the Bootes page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible from 20:00 appearing on the eastern horizon at 20:00, reaching its peak at 02:30 and disappearing 50 degrees above the western horizon at sunrise.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Very hard – Locating asterism: Big Dipper

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 50 south – passes overhead for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during early morning: December.

Middle of sky (north, south and overhead)

Ursa Major & The Big Dipper

Visit the Ursa Major page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible throughout the night appearing 30 degrees above the south east horizon at sunset, reaching its peak at 24:00 and disappearing 35 degrees above the south west horizon.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Medium – Locating asterism: Big Dipper

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 20 south – passes in the northern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during early morning: December to January.

Ursa Minor & The north star

Visit the Ursa Minor page for instructions on how to find, mythology, stars, nearby constellations and general information.

Visible throughout the night remaining in the north sky equal to the distance above the horizon to the latitude of your viewing position.

Difficulty to find: Easy – Difficulty to interpret: Medium – Locating asterism: Big Dipper or Cassiopeia

Possible to be seen between latitude 90 north and 0 south – static in the northern sky for northern hemisphere viewers – Best month to see high in sky during early morning: All year.

Eastern Sky (season starting)

To be added